The driver can pull his hands from the wheel, peek out the window here and there and let adaptive cruise control manage the following distance of cars ahead. James M Amend reports.

General Motors joins the saleable autonomous-vehicle market with the launch this fall of the ’18 Cadillac CT6 with available Super Cruise, a hands-free driving technology that is superbly integrated and easy-to-use if not a skosh late to U.S. dealers.

Operating the technology requires regular driver supervision and it works only on limited-access highways without cross-traffic intersections or stoplights. But once activated, the driver can pull his hands from the wheel, peek out the window here and there and leisurely let adaptive cruise control manage the following distance of cars ahead.

“This is hands-free, (but) the driver is responsible for supervising,” says Daryl Wilson, lead development engineer-Super Cruise at GM.

Super Cruise could be considered Level 3 autonomous-driving technology, or conditional automation where the car is in control and constantly monitors the roadway but will re-engage the human driver when appropriate. However, GM refuses to assign it SAE taxonomy as other automakers have with their systems. This article first appeared in WardsAuto.

TU-Automotive ADAS & Autonomous USA 2017

02 Oct 2017 - 03 Oct 2017, NOVI, USA

The most focused forum on the here and now of self-driving technology. As these technologies storm the headlines, we focus on the current challenges and unite players from research labs, automakers, tier 1’s and the complete supply chain to plan for the imminent future.