Automobiles will choke on the data without new high-speed connectivity technology onboard. David E. Zoia reports.

In-car connectivity is strangling the auto industry. So says Daniel Shwartzberg, whose company, Israel-based microchip supplier Valens, is offering a solution that appears to be gaining traction with automakers as they begin the march toward the automated-driving age.

Called HDBaseT, Valens’ long-touted, high-speed connectivity solution has entered the advanced testing stage at several automakers and Tier 1 suppliers and will move to the next phase with its first production programme set for a ʼ20-model Mercedes vehicle platform.

The problem the industry faces, as Shwartzberg sees it, is the need for vehicle systems to process and share exponentially growing amounts of onboard data quickly while being hampered by an aging wiring architecture that is too slow and too complicated to get the job done.

Currently, vehicle electronics systems resemble a Tower of Babel of connectivity. Some microprocessors and devices run on the Controller Area Network (CAN) bus communication protocol. Others operate via FlexRay, Linux, TTP (Time Triggered Protocol) or Ethernet networks. The multiple connectivity technologies are used because some devices perform better with specific protocols but, to share data throughout the vehicle, special networking gateways are needed to serve as data translators so a system or device operating on one protocol can talk with one tied into another.

HDBaseT promises to solve that communications snarl, Valens contends, because it can work well as the connectivity solution for all onboard applications. This article first appeared in WardsAuto.

TU-Automotive Detroit 2018

06 Jun 2018 - 07 Jun 2018, Novi, USA

With 150 speakers, a 200,000 sq ft exhibition and 3000 attendees, TU-Automotive Detroit is the world's biggest conference & expo for connected & autonomous cars.